GoBabyGo! is a program that modifies Electric toy cars for children with motor disabilities

 Mart's family expressed interest in  GoBabyGo!  and a date was set to make his car. During the build, the Paladins and his therapist worked to make him comfortable by placing pool noodles for arm rests and support. Since the initial build he has been showing off his car to the community, even making an appearance at the North West Michigan Robotics Conference hosted by the Paladins.

Mart's family expressed interest in GoBabyGo! and a date was set to make his car. During the build, the Paladins and his therapist worked to make him comfortable by placing pool noodles for arm rests and support. Since the initial build he has been showing off his car to the community, even making an appearance at the North West Michigan Robotics Conference hosted by the Paladins.

The Petoskey Paladins are trying to get as many teams involved with the program as possible in hopes of helping out more and more kids. GoBabyGo! is truly a remarkable experience. After all the work that is done to modify the cars, the look on the child's face when they realize they can move the car themselves is truly special. While most children have the opportunity to run around and play, these kids do not have the ability to do that, and their cars give them the opportunity to be like everyone else.

 

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Charlevoix-Emmet Intermediate School District (Char-Em ISD)

 Jeremiah sits in his brand new Lightning McQueen car that he can move by himself. The pedals were changed to be a button on the steering wheel and a custom chair keeps him comfortable and upright.

Jeremiah sits in his brand new Lightning McQueen car that he can move by himself. The pedals were changed to be a button on the steering wheel and a custom chair keeps him comfortable and upright.

 Since Brook only has mobility in her head, the robotics team made sure she would still be able to move the car by herself. They positioned the button to the side of her head instead of in front of her, and she loves to drive the car around.

Since Brook only has mobility in her head, the robotics team made sure she would still be able to move the car by herself. They positioned the button to the side of her head instead of in front of her, and she loves to drive the car around.

Here is a link to the news story about the Petoskey Paladins from the build of Jeremiah's car. The story was featured on local news stations and was even picked up by the national news through CNN.

Visit GoBabyGo! Connect, which is “an online forum designed to connect chapters, families, robotics teams, universities, and other innovators that are all working towards a common goal: to improve the lives of children with limited mobility.  Let’s share our ideas, inspirations, manuals, pictures, questions, and success stories to learn from one another’s work in order to help as many children as possible.”